Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

sngalbums: Originally appeared on Grimy Goods.  Adams worked mostly solo on this record. A few guests contribute on the refrains, grounding the lofty project, but never detract attention away from what is largely autobiographical. Emay also produced all the backing tracks throughout Ilah, filling it with chopped drums and spliced samples for a unique listening experience, if not an acquired taste. The album’s production is … Continue reading Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

sngalbums: Originally appeared on Grimy Goods.  Adams worked mostly solo on this record. A few guests contribute on the refrains, grounding the lofty project, but never detract attention away from what is largely autobiographical. Emay also produced all the backing tracks throughout Ilah, filling it with chopped drums and spliced samples for a unique listening experience, if not an acquired taste. The album’s production is … Continue reading Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

Originally appeared on Grimy Goods. Adams worked mostly solo on this record. A few guests contribute on the refrains, grounding the lofty project, but never detract attention away from what is largely autobiographical. Emay also produced all the backing tracks throughout Ilah, filling it with chopped drums and spliced samples for a unique listening experience, if not an acquired taste. The album’s production is tied … Continue reading Are Our Gods Best? Ruminating on Emay’s New LP, Ilah

Crawl Space is one of my most anticipated albums of the year, and that’s a category that includes Humanz, Gothic Tropic, Feist, FLEET FOXES, Grizzly Bear (?), Arca, and Marika Hackman’s I’m Not Your Man! And it’s already been a great year with the masterful Semper Femina, Emay’s newest, and Mount Eerie [deep sigh].  Felt good to get that all out. It’s a good year for … Continue reading

Emay caught my attention with “Israfil,” or Angel’s Trumpet, an industrial rap of great personal significance. On his new single, “Bakkah,” he drifts further into spoken word, discussing the foundations of human emotion, touching on the necessity of religion and class struggles. His highly anticipated debut album Ilah is due out soon, though no release date has been announced.  Continue reading